Psychology, B.S.

Starting January 2018!

Earn Your Bachelor's Degree in Psychology Online

The online Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology provides students with a detailed knowledge of the field of psychology, including its historical background, paradigms, methods, research findings, and applications. Our graduates may also move on to graduate level work including masters and doctoral programs.

8

Week Classes

20

Elective Courses

39

Advanced Psychology Credits

3

Start Terms Per Year

Freshman Admissions Requirements

Program Prerequisites

To be completed prior to matriculation:

  • Must be a graduate of a regionally accredited secondary school with successful completion of 16 acceptable units of academic work, including
    • 4 units in English
    • 3 units in Mathematics
    • 2 units in a lab science
    • 2 units in the social sciences
    • 5 electives (minimum)
  • SAT or ACT test scores

Required Materials for Admission

  • Application for Admission
  • Official High School Transcript
  • SAT or ACT Scores
  • FAFSA (if you are applying for financial aid)
  • $25.00 Non-Refundable Application Fee

Recommended Materials for Admission

  • Two Letters of Recommendation
  • Personal Statement

Transfer Admissions Requirements

Program Prerequisites

To be completed prior to matriculation:

  • Must have attended a regionally accredited post-secondary institution and successfully completed 12 or more credit hours

Required Materials for Admission

  • Application for Admission
  • Official college transcript(s) from all previous institutions of higher education attended
  • Proof of high school graduation (official high school transcript or copy of high school diploma)
  • FAFSA (if you are applying for financial aid)
  • $25.00 Non-Refundable Application Fee

Recommended Materials for Admission

  • Two Letters of Recommendation
  • Personal Statement

Deadlines

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.  Applications and all required application materials must be submitted at least 10 business days before the start of the term in which you wish to enroll.

Questions?

Visit How to Apply to learn more about the process and how to contact your admissions counselor.

University Core Curriculum (43 credits)

General education course requirements can be found in the UB Catalog.

  • FYS 101 First Year Seminar (3 credits)
  • ENGL 101 Composition & Rhetoric (3 credits)
  • MATH 103+103p Intro to College Algebra/Stats (3 + 1 credits)
  • Humanities (6 credits)
  • Social Science (6 credits)
  • Natural Science (6 credits)
  • Fine Arts (3 credits)
  • Capstone Seminar (3 credits)
  • Liberal Arts Electives (9 credits)

Online Psychology Core (24 Credits)

PSYC 103 Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the field of psychology, including such topics as research methods, the brain, neuronal structure and functioning, sleep and dreaming, cognitive and social development, learning, memory, intelligence, personality, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social cognition, and social influence. This course is a prerequisite of all higher-numbered psychology courses, with the exception of PSYC 201 (Child Psychology) which can be taken concurrently with PSYC 103.

Credits: 3

PSYC 201 Child Psychology

This course will examine the theories and issues surrounding biological, cognitive and psychosocial development from conception to pubescence. This course is interactive with a focus on personal life experience and current social events.

Credits: 3

PSYC 230 Abnormal Psychology

The course will focus on the study of those thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that interfere with psychologically adaptive functioning. The causes and appropriate treatments of mood disorders, personality disorders, schizophrenia, adjustment reactions, and other disorders as specified in the DSM will be discussed.

Prerequisite Course: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 240 Social Psychology

This course is designed to provide an overview of the field of social psychology. Learning will be accomplished through reading and discussion of the text, as well as presentation of supplemental material provided by the instructor along with in-class activities, videos and discussion. Topics will include discussion of the varying domains of research in social psychology, important studies in the field, and how it applies to academia and everyday life. Topics will include: attitudes and attitude formation, persuasion, aggression, conformity, obedience, culture, helping behaviors, attraction, self-concept, as well as discrimination and prejudice.

Prerequisite Course: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 303 Personality Psychology

This course will focus on the structure, dynamics, and development of personality. Major personality theories – psychoanalytic, trait, behavioral, cognitive, socio-biological, humanistic/existential – and their implications for understanding human cognition and behavior, will be discussed.

Prerequisite Course: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 307 Cognitive Psychology

This course will focus on recent advances in the understanding of thought processes. There will be a focus on attention, perception, memory, imagery, problem solving, language, intelligence, creativity, and dreaming.

Prerequisite Course: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 321 Research Methods

Students will explore and evaluate the validity of various experimental and non-experimental research strategies and gain experience collecting psychological data, in groups and individually. The course provides foundations of statistical analysis, including both descriptive and introductory inferential statistics.

Prerequisite Course: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 385 Statistical Methods in Psychology

This course will provide the student with an overview of basic statistical theories and methodologies used in modern psychological research. Topics will include the theoretical basis, application, and methodologies involved in descriptive statistics, correlations, t-tests, ANOVAs and regressions.

Prerequisite Courses: PSYC 103 and MATH 105M with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

Online Psychology Electives (15 Credits)

PSYC 202 Adolescence

This course will examine the theories and issues surrounding biological, cognitive and psychosocial development from pubescence to adulthood. Students explore experiences and values related to risk taking, friendship, peer-groups, peer-pressure, marriage, relationships, parenting, and sexuality.

Credits: 3

PSYC 203 Maturity and Aging

This course will examine the theories and issues surrounding biological, cognitive and psychosocial development from adulthood through death and the process of dying. This course is interactive and focuses on personal experiences and reactions. Important questions about health, longevity, aging, and the dying process are explored.

Credits: 3

PSYC 205 Lifespan Developmental Psychology

This course will examine the theories and issues surrounding biological, cognitive, and psychosocial development from birth through death. Topics will include attachment, social development, theories and theorists related to developmental change, aging, and health factors impacting each stage of development.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 309 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

This course provides an application of psychological principles to industry, business, transportation, communications, institutions, leadership, and consumer behavior.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 310 Human Sexuality

Physiological and psychological components of human sexuality, and their interaction will be discussed. There will be a focus on health and social issues and on individual, gender, and cultural differences.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 314 Educational Psychology

Psychological concepts, principles, theory, and research will be applied to the teaching and learning process. There will be a focus on growth and development, adjustment and personality, learning, measurement, and evaluation.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 316 Current Topics in Psychology

Examination of one or more currently prominent topics in psychology, such as memory reconstruction, sexual orientation, emotional intelligence, brain plasticity, or hate crimes.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 333 Exceptional Child

Major categories of exceptional children, their identifying characteristics, and programs to meet their special needs. Course also includes an introduction to child psychopathology. Nature of different disorders, theories of causation, and treatment approaches such as play therapy, behavioral modification, and family therapy.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 345 Health Psychology

This course will explore how psychological theories are applied to behaviors associated with health. Students will examine the cognitive and behavioral processes associated with a wide range of mental and physical health activities. Theories and research from clinical, social, developmental and biological backgrounds will be discussed in regards to their application to health behaviors. Specific topics will include stress and coping, drug and alcohol use, social support, health stigmas, patient/provider interactions, pain and pain management, and disorders related to health.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 346 Animal Behavior

This course integrates the proximate and ultimate causes of behavior through survey of key concepts, theories and models in the field of Animal Behavior. Students will explore the mechanistic causes of behavior including the, genetic, hormonal, neural and environmental influences on behavioral development and expression. Students will examine behaviors important to survival (such as finding food and avoiding predators) and those important to reproduction (such as selecting mates) while considering the manner in which these behaviors are shaped and constrained by ecology and evolutionary history. Students will actively examine classic theories and research in this area, and compare and contrast it with modern scientific perspectives from numerous disciplines.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 348 Psychology of Women

This course will cover various aspects of the psychology of women such as gender stereotypes and biases, gender comparisons social situations, women and work, love relationships, women and psychological disorders, and violence against women.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 355 Sports Psychology

A study of the psychological foundations of physical activity. An overview of the psychological and mental factors that influence and are influenced by participation and performance in sports, exercise and physical activity. Included are applications of the knowledge gained through research to everyday settings.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 370 Forensic Psychology

Surveys the overall intersection of psychology and the American court system. Emphasis will be placed on issues related to clinical psychology/psychiatry in the criminal justice system such as sanity evaluation, criminal profiling and assessment of dangerousness.  Students will explore how forensic psychologists have been involved in the jury selection process and have contributed to our understanding, of eyewitness testimony (limitations of memory) and the detection of deceit through the polygraph and other techniques.  Finally, students will explore how professionals trained in developmental, organizational, and clinical psychology interact with the court system when they serve as “expert witnesses” in a variety of civil and probate matters.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 375 Psychology of Stigma

This course will broadly explore the psychological foundations of stigma, as well as the ramifications of being stigmatized. Theories as to why people stigmatize others, how this is justified and rationalized, and how people cope with being stigmatized will be explored. Specific topics will include racism and discrimination, social exclusion, gender and sexuality bias, stigma consciousness and self-concept, ageism, and taboo behavior. Students will integrate theories of stigma with other modern psychological principles, and will actively discuss and write on these concepts.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 380 Biological Psychology

The biological mechanisms underlying human behavior will be explored. This course will focus on evolution, genetics, and the anatomy and physiology of the human brain and nervous system.  How these systems are affected and impacted by sensory systems, movement, waking and sleeping, homeostasis, hormones, sexual behavior, emotions, learning, memory, and language will be discussed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 381 Drug Effects and Behavior

Fundamentals of psychopharmacological research with emphasis on human drug-taking behavior will be discussed. A discussion of the various psychoactive drugs and implications of their use will occur.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 390 Psychology Research Practicum

This course is designed to give students the opportunity and experience of assisting with empirical research in psychology, under directed mentorship of a faculty member at UB. Prior approval by that faculty member is required. Directed mentorship in a psychology laboratory outside of UB will be considered. Students will learn about the ethics involved in human research, and will assist a faculty member in their research through activities such as participant recruitment, survey administration and other forms of data collection, data entry, and empirical literature review. Students will provide a written summative overview of their experience at the end of the semester.

Prerequisite: This course is by instructor permission only, and is limited to psychology (or closely related area) majors with a minimum of sophomore standing and a 3.3 cumulative GPA + PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 2 - 4

PSYC 395 Senior Thesis in Psychology

Students work individually with their advisor to produce an integrative review or conduct empirical research on a specific topic within psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYC 103 with a grade of “C" or higher

Credits: 3

PSYC 398 Careers in Psychology (Internship)

This course is designed to give students practical experience applying their knowledge of psychology or psychology related principles to an actual career or work setting. Internships may take place in local businesses, mental health and crisis centers, schools, residential settings, criminal justice programs, camps, college campuses, hospitals, community centers and other related environments. Students must have a designated, qualified supervisor within the work environment. Students provide written documentation that relates their knowledge to the work setting.

Prerequisite: This course is by instructor permission only.

Credits: 3 - 6

PSYC 399 Individual Study in Psychology

An opportunity to study topics not covered in regular course offerings or to carry out an individual course of instruction.

Credits: 1 - 6

Free Electives (38 credits)

Many students choose to take their 38 credits of free electives to minor in another area such as human services or business while still graduating in the same amount of time as a traditional Psychology major.

 

A total of 120 credits are required for graduation.

By completing the B.S. in Psychology degree program, you will:

  • Have learned the pre-history and the history of Psychology including the evolution of its main issues, topic areas, methods, and applications
  • Know the major perspectives in Psychology, including Psychoanalytic Theory, Behaviorism, Humanistic Psychology, Social Learning, and Cognitive Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Understand the lifespan approach to human biological, cognitive, and psychosocial development
  • Be able to understand and provide examples of the major forms of psychological research, including methodologies such as naturalistic observation, surveys, case studies and archival research, and the main features and techniques of psychological experimentation
  • Understand basic data organization, presentation, and statistical analysis, including both inferential and descriptive statistics
  • Understand characteristics of psychological research, including the limitations of correlation research, experimental biases, placebo effects, and ethical issues regarding human subjects
  • Be able to critically evaluate the psychological research presented in the popular press and peer-reviewed journals
  • Be able to relate key psychological concepts and theories to their own personal lives
  • Understand how key psychological concepts and theories are applied in clinical, medical, educational, human services, and corporate settings
  • Understand connections between Psychology and such other disciplines as Biology, Philosophy, Business, Sociology, Religion, and Human Services

Build a Solid Foundation for a Future in Psychology, Counseling, or Mental Health

With an undergraduate degree in Psychology, you will be equipped for success in a wide array of professional settings including case management, advocacy, clinical and experimental/neuroscience research, counseling, and business. Psychology is one of the most popular undergraduate degrees today, given the wide range of career outcomes available. The Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree program at the University of Bridgeport will give you the knowledge-base, mentorship, and skill sets needed for a successful career in fields related to human thought, behavior, and cognition.

How can UB help me reach my career goals?

Preparation for Future Studies

Many of our Psychology degree program graduates go on to pursue a master’s degree and/or doctoral degree. The University of Bridgeport offers a variety of programs that allow you to easily continue your studies in UB’s School of Arts and Sciences, as well as in UB’s School of Education and College of Public and International Affairs. Popular selections include the following degrees:

The Psychology (B.S.) degree program will also prepare you for graduate studies at the masters and doctoral level in Social Work, Industrial/ Organizational Psychology, Counseling, Education, Human Resources Management, Social Psychology, Child/Developmental Psychology and Clinical Psychology.

Career Assistance

UB's Center for Career Development helps graduates prepare for entrance into the workforce. Our comprehensive career counseling and resource center is dedicated to helping you become an active participant in your own academic, professional, and career development.

Services provided include basics like resume and cover letter building, interview preparation, negotiation, goal assessment, and personal branding.

What's UBJobnet?

UBjobnet is UB’s internal job portal–open only to UB students and alumni! Here, you can access a variety of opportunities posted by local and national employers. Search for jobs/internships, submit your resume online, register for career related events, or all of the above.

To access UBjobnet:

  • Login to the myUB Portal
  • Click on the “Quick Links” box on the right side to navigate to UBjobnet
  • Find the resources that suit your needs:
    • Job Search: Find full-time, part-time, internship, student employment and volunteer opportunities
    • Email me new jobs: Set up job alerts by clicking “Email me new jobs” located above your search results. Use specific keywords to help tailor your emails to match your interests
    • Career Events: Register for and learn about more upcoming events
    • Employer Directory: Find and research companies related to your desired field
  • Upload your updated resume and cover letters to UBjobnet to be able to easily apply to posted positions through the system
  • Update your major, GPA, and graduation year in your profile to receive information on jobs and events related to your field

The Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology prepares you for work that requires liberal arts training as well as psychological knowledge and skills.  The major provides you with a detailed awareness of the field of psychology, including its historical background, paradigms, methods, research findings, and applications.  The major addresses the general areas of developmental, personality, social, cognitive, and abnormal psychology.  It fosters the development of verbal, quantitative, analytical, and technological skills that are useful for work in psychology and related fields.

The major requires thirteen psychology courses (39 semester hours), including Introduction to Psychology (103), Child Psychology (201), Abnormal Psychology (230), Social Psychology (240), Personality Psychology (303), Cognitive Psychology (307), Research Methods (321), Statistical Methods in Psychology (385) and five other elective psychology courses (15 semester hours total of psychology electives). A total of 120 credits are required for graduation.

All major coursework (i.e., all courses taken in PSYC) must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher, to count toward the major requirements. Students must also graduate with a minimum of 2.0 GPA for all major coursework.

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